Olympia Fitness RI

Olympia Fitness + Performance is a state of the art training facility in Cranston RI that employs a highly qualified staff of Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialists (CSCS) and Certified Personal Trainers. We have worked with athletes and professionals of all ability levels and walks of life, and will do whatever it takes to help you achieve your goals. So what are you waiting for? Regardless of your current level of fitness, the time to start is now!

(401) 467-6701
Mon - Fri 6AM - 8PM
Saturday 8AM - 12PM | Sunday CLOSED
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(401) 467-6701

Sports Training

Being in the private sector of the strength and conditioning field, we have the privilege of talking to many different coaches and the parents of many young athletes. In doing so, I’ve started to notice a promising trend from talking to them; they feel like their kids are doing too much of the same. In recent years we’ve seen the money making machine of AAU sports and sport-specific coaching take off, and at this point it’s become borderline ridiculous.   Why does any 10-year-old need to be throwing a baseball in December

Whether an athlete enjoys working on it or not, conditioning needs to be a top priority for nearly all athletes. It’s impossible to compete at the highest level that an athlete can without being highly conditioned. In order to reach that high level, athletes need to set goals and have proper program to help them achieve them. Setting Goals Goals need to be specific to each sport. A 400m runner should have a different goal compared to a basketball or soccer player. The runner may have a goal of running a sub

As we’ve written about before, getting young athletes involved in strength and conditioning has numerous benefits. That being said, one of the more difficult aspects of training young athletes is keeping them interested and excited to come to the gym to train. The best way to keep a young athlete coming back to the gym is to make it feel like play, while also improving their sport performance. Here are 5 drills to try with youth athletes to get them faster and stronger, while feeling like recess! Paloff ABCs Any paloff press

You can play it anywhere with no equipment except for some sort of ball. Whether it’s soccer, futbol, or football, the game is incredible. I know my life, as well as millions of others, has been shaped by it.  From playing in college to playing in the street with friends, soccer can be an extremely physically demanding game. From the repeated sprints, to long runs back to goal, or hard 50-50 challenges for 90+ minutes, top players need to be physically capable. With that in mind, here are 4 key

If you’ve tuned into any of the Olympic Trials recently, you have surely seen some of the incredible performances that athletes have left on the competitive stage. While these athletes have undergone thousands of hours of physical training, these phenomenal performances go deeper than just physical training. Athletes, like Sydney McLaughlin, the most recent 400m hurdles world record holder, are not impressing the world by staying within their comfort zones. When practicing to push their bodies to their limits, athletes must also practice pushing their minds to those same limits.   The

According to Stanford Children’s Health Organization, about thirty million children and teens participate in some form of organized sports, and more than 3.5 million injuries occur each year.  Perhaps this is due to the fact that many of these athletes are going through their “peak height velocity” period, also known as the growth spurt.  Growth spurts usually occur at around age 12 for females and age 14 in males.  During this phase, bones weaken, muscle imbalances develop, and muscle-tendon units tighten.  All of which are risk factors for injury.  Young

ACL injuries are devastating, and the best remedy for them is to try to prevent them in the first place. In a recent blog post, coach Mike Lefebvre listed 4 things to help prevent ACL tears and laid out a few concepts that we like to train in order to prevent ACL injuries. When we train these concepts, most exercises fit into more than one of the concepts that he mentioned. Below are a few examples of my favorites.   Single Leg Landmine RDL Why I like it: The landmine RDL hits just about

Small Quality Baby Steps In today’s world we want everything in an instant. From what we eat to our online orders, we want things as fast as possible. This same principle applies to us after an injury or when we’re suffering from pain. We all want the fastest route to the state we were in prior to the injury or pain, but what many people fail to realize is that getting things quickly comes at a cost.  The cost when it comes to post rehab training is that if we

A common misconception is the belief that athletes should stop training entirely while they are in-season.  It’s always a headscratcher when an athlete I’ve been working with is steadily progressing, then I get the “hey coach, I’m going to stop training because my season is starting” message.  Of course, collegiate athletes heading back to school who have their specific strength programs are an exception.  This usually applies to adolescent and high school athletes whether they are single-sport or multi-sport athletes.  It’s foreseeable that in-season athletes schedules will be hectic due

Hamstring injuries are no joke and can linger longer than athletes want.  We all know athletes who have had hamstring injury issues that seem to never go away. They’re one of the most common injuries among athletes and studies have shown that reoccurrence rates of these injuries are high as well.  With these two ideas in mind, hamstring injury prevention should be top priority for athletes who sports require them to complete high intense sprints and changes of direction.   To start off, we need to know what the hamstrings do. The