Olympia Fitness RI

Olympia Fitness + Performance is a state of the art training facility in Cranston RI that employs a highly qualified staff of Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialists (CSCS) and Certified Personal Trainers. We have worked with athletes and professionals of all ability levels and walks of life, and will do whatever it takes to help you achieve your goals. So what are you waiting for? Regardless of your current level of fitness, the time to start is now!

(401) 467-6701
Mon - Fri 6AM - 8PM
Saturday 8AM - 12PM | Sunday CLOSED
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(401) 467-6701

Author: OlympiaFitness

In recent years, we have seen a steady increase in the number of ACL injuries, particularly in young female athletes. Why is this happening and how can we prevent it? There are a multitude of possible reason for it, but the good news is that it is preventable. Much of the cause is due to the increased participation in sports over the past 30 years, and particularly the increased participation in women’s sports. Women are naturally prone to suffering ACL injuries because of a series of anatomical factors working against

A skater will briefly use short choppy strides when changing direction from backwards to forwards (hockey), or when starting a race (speedskating). However, in terms of building and maintaining maximum speed, both athletes need to develop a long stride. In simple terms, a long stride is one where the pushing leg reaches full extension, and the athlete is able to balance on the gliding leg long enough to begin loading that leg for the next push. The following activities require minimal equipment and will pay big dividends. Hard Roll Skating power

Protein is a valuable source for all of us.  It helps us build and sustain our muscles, which help us in everyday activities and are even more important for us if we’re athletes.   Although for most of our lives we’ve been feed the idea that meat is the way to go to get all the protein we need, there are other options that are just as good that also highly nutritious. These alternative protein sources can work well with people who try to avoid eating meat in their diet but also

Do I what? Disassociate from what? How am I supposed to do that?   Disassociation is a major component of athletics and golf that is often utilized without even realizing it. If you watch just about any professional sport you’ll be able to pick it out. Watch the quarterback or baseball player snap their hips to create power in their throw or put speed behind the bat. The same technique applies to golf and actually has a specific sequence that it’s supposed to follow. Disassociation is where a great deal of your

Renowned strength and conditioning coach Eric Cressey made a great post recently about the power of a good warm-up.  Cressey said “some of my best workouts came on days when the idea of training seemed impossible.  Sometimes all you need to do is walk through the doors and put yourself through a solid warm-up, then see how you feel.”  Simple message, yet so incredibly accurate.  We all have those sluggish days when we’re not fired up mentally and/or physically.  But did you ever regret a workout?  These are the workouts

I don’t know how to ride a bike. Not on the street, at least. So I do quite a bit of conditioning in my basement, on an old road bike hooked up to a trainer. To get myself through 20, 30 or 40 minutes of sheer boredom, I listen to a podcast called The Moth Radio Hour. The series is comprised of recordings of people telling their real-life stories, live and on-stage. I recently a listened to a story by Sharon Salzburg, a meditation teacher who brought the discipline to the United

I always look forward getting my beauty sleep at the end of each day and I love naps.   I’ve taken plenty of them, especially after a game or a tough training session. And although sometimes I plan to sleep for 30 minutes and end up sleeping for more than an hour and half, I always feel better.   The power of sleeping and recovery is under appreciated and most athletes don’t even know what they’re missing out on.  Like many of us, athletes face problems with sleep, ranging from having trouble falling asleep

There is a lot more to training a young athlete than just making them stronger. Making them stronger is certainly a large piece of the pie, but there are other factors in building an athletic base that are just as important. While hurdles aren’t the only way that these concepts can be trained, they’re definitely one of the most effective and efficient ways. Not only will training with hurdles make you a better athlete, but they’ll also make you less likely to get injured.   1- Landing mechanics – First and foremost.

“On a scale ranging from 1 to 10, how difficult was that exercise?”   That’s the most common question I ask throughout the day. From youth athletes looking to get stronger, to the athlete making the transition from high school to college, to the everyday man or woman just trying to improve their health in our fitness classes, that question will be always asked to help the person grow.   Like everything else in life, we have to want to challenge ourselves and step out of our comfort bubble in order to truly improve.

"What could I have done to prevent this?"   I asked myself that question everyday for five months while struggling to walk up the front steps of my middle school in crutches.  When I was fourteen I suffered an awful ankle injury playing basketball.  I was in a cast for what felt like a lifetime.  I was miserable and extremely upset that I couldn’t play basketball.  When the cast was finally removed, I went through physical therapy and that's when my passion for exercise science blossomed.  After about two sessions it dawned